Archive for police

Man Ticketed for Calling 911 Three Times…to Report a Break-In at His Mother’s

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 8, 2012 by truthwillrise

This is utterly ridiulous! The police department and the city government of Detroit should be ashamed of themselves! 

Taken from yahoo news:

 

A Detroit man who called 911 three times to report a break-in at his mother’s apartment has been ticketed for “misuse” of the emergency line, even though the reason he kept calling was because it took police hours to show up.

Sean Street told Detroit Fox affiliate WJBK-TV his mother called him when she returned home and saw her front door had been kicked in. He called 911, then jumped in his car to go over to her apartment.

It took him an hour to get there, and when he arrived police hadn’t shown up. He made another 911 call and another hour later they still hadn’t come by, so he called a third time.

“[There] was no profanity whatsoever. I was very polite with them. The officer actually seemed very polite, also, and he told me let us handle it. Don’t take matters into your own hands,” Street told the station.

When police finally showed up, they talked to a witness who said he had seen two males wearing black hoods break into the home.

“[The officer said] there was nothing they could do about it,” Street said. “I asked him if they would’ve came on time, the guys would’ve still been there? He said, if you want us to have a faster response time, contact the mayor to see if we can arrive on time faster and have more police officers.”

Street said police never followed up with his mother, but that a week later he opened up his mail to find he’d been sent a misdemeanor ticket for “malicious use of communications device misuse of 911.” It said Street repeatedly called 911, escalating a police run because he was unsatisfied with the response time, according to WJBK.

He must appear in court and if convicted, faces a $500 fine and up to 90 days in jail. He plans to contest the ticket.

“They found the time to write me a ticket,” he said. “They never followed up with my mom about the investigation, the detective at all, but the detective actually had time to write me a ticket for that.”

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Video Shows Officer Offering Truckers Freedom For Cash

Posted in Attack on Freedom, Corruption, New World Order, News, Police State/Martial Law, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2011 by truthwillrise

By Phil Williams
Chief Investigative Reporter

Video of the traffic stop

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — New video obtained byNewsChannel 5 Investigates shows an interstate interdiction officer offering to trade the freedom of two truckers — for their cash.

The DA says it’s good police work.

But critics say it’s a prime example of how the rules have been twisted by laws that let agencies keep the money they seize.

The video — obtained under the Tennessee Public Records Act — shows a May 2010 traffic stop in rural Hickman County, on a darkened stretch of westbound Interstate 40.

There, two California truckers were given a tough choice: potentially face a criminal prosecution or hand over the cash that the interdiction officer suspects is hidden somewhere in their tractor trailer.

“You’re going to have to trust me, or you’re going to out on a limb and see what happens once we find it,” the officer told the truckers.

Before the night was up, agents recovered piles of suspected drug money — almost a half a million dollars — money that their agency, the 21st Judicial District Drug Task Force, will get to keep.
Read officers’ narrative about why money seized

“I will do everything I can to take that money out of the hands of those drug dealers and the cartel,” District Attorney General Kim Helper toldNewsChannel 5 Investigates.

But Helper said the two truckers — who she believes were drug couriers — got to walk without even being asked to name their accomplices because she believes they had not really committed a crime that she could prosecute.

“The transportation of illegal drug proceeds through the state of Tennessee from my reading of the statute is not a crime,” Helper insisted.

The incident began as a routine traffic stop, except in this case agents are specifically looking for drug money heading back to Mexico.

Officer: “You say you’re not traveling with anything illegal in your truck, right? No drugs? And you’re not traveling with any large amounts of U.S. currency?”
Trucker: “No, sir. No, sir. No, sir.”
Officer: “You wouldn’t have a problem if I searched your truck or your trailer for any of the items mentioned?”
Driver: “Not at all.”

As the time passed, suspicions were aroused by discrepancies in the truckers’ stories, but officers were not finding anything up in the refrigerated trailer, known as a reefer.

So the agent began threatening the truckers with criminal prosecution.

Officer: “Money laundering is what it’s called, and it’s a federal offense. The good thing for you is when we seize money we don’t deal with the feds. We seize it ourselves.  And if it ain’t your money and you say ‘Agent Owens, it ain’t my money, I don’t know how it got there…'”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked the DA if the officer was not suggesting to the truck driver that his defense would be that he did not know how the money got there.

“I don’t think he is,” she answered, “because I think he recognizes at this point that the transport of money just through the state is not a crime under our money laundering statute.”

Yet, these are some of the statements that the officer made:

Officer: “Here’s the thing, alright. Don’t talk to him, just listen. Just listen. Do you want to go home?”
Trucker: “I sure do.”
Officer: “Does it not make sense that I’m trying to help you… because you honestly can’t think for a second that we ain’t going to stay here until we find it.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates told Helper that the officer “sure is making this guy think he’s committed a crime.”

“Well, as I indicated to you,” she responded, “law enforcement agents use various means of questioning to get as much information as they can.”

But if someone has not committed a crime, is it proper for a police officer to make that person think that they have?

“I believe,” Helper said, “that officers can use a variety of techniques.”

The officer also assured the driver, that if they would cough up the cash, they would not be asked to rat out their accomplices.

Officer: “Hey, I’m not asking you if you have knowledge about it, and I won’t ask you if you have knowledge about it. You understand me? It’s not my job…. All I’m asking you is, where’s the money?”

Officer: “I don’t even care where you got it. I want the product. That’s what I’m after.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to the DA that “throughout this incident the officers tell him you do not have to tell us where you got this money.”

Is that police work?

“Police work,” Helper said, “to the extent that these officers, from my perspective,  are trying to work with these guys who are merely the couriers.”

Still, we pressed, “At no point does any officer ever ask, ‘What’s the name of the big fish in this case?'”

“Right, right,” the DA acknowledged. “And I agree with you. Should they have asked it? Maybe.”

Finally, an hour into the traffic stop, the driver came clean.

Officer: “We’ll come back and you sign these forms saying you don’t know anything about it, you’re disclaiming it, it’s not yours and it’s done.”
Driver: “It’s in the back of the reefer. I don’t know how it got there.”
Officer: “OK.”
Driver: “It’s not mine.”
Officer: “We’re good!”

A short time later, the task force would be half a million dollars richer.

Still, the DA admitted that she isn’t completely happy with the outcome.

“I would love to see our legislature make a change so that we can make those arrests on the sides of the roads with these guys.”

We also found cases in the Dickson area where subjects admitted that the money was from drugs. Not only were they released, but we’re told that the video evidence of those stops was later destroyed.
Subject admitted $161,500 “was illegal drug money”
Subject admitted $46,500 “was illegal drug money”
Subject admitted $59,760 “was illegal drug money”
Subject admitted $198,000 “from the sale of cocaine”
Subject admitted $800,495 “from the sales of marijuana”

Still, a Nashville prosecutor, who was involved in drafting the state’s money laundering statute, tells NewsChannel 5 Investigates that he thinks the law could be used to bring criminal charges against some people running money for the drug cartels.

Helper says she’ll now ask lawmakers to clarify the law — something that apparently no DA had bothered to do before our investigation.

E-mail: pwilliams@newschannel5.com 

Back to NC5 Investigates: Policing for Profit

Middle Tennessee Police Profiting Off Drug Trade?

Posted in Attack on Freedom, Business, Corruption, economic tyranny, Economy, News, Police State/Martial Law, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2011 by truthwillrise

Poilce Corruption

By Phil Williams
Chief Investigative Reporter

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A major NewsChannel 5 investigation has uncovered serious questions about Tennessee’s war on drugs. Among the questions: are some police agencies more concerned about making money off the drugs, than stopping them?

At the center of this months-long investigation are laws that let officers pull driver over looking for cash.  Those officers do not even have to file criminal charges against a person to take his/her money.

It turns out, those kind of stops are now happening almost every day in Middle Tennessee.

Case in point: a 2009 stop where a tractor trailer was stopped for a traffic violation, leading to a search and the discovery of large blocks containing almost $200,000 cash — cash that officers keep on the suspicion that it’s drug money.

“What’s wrong with having a large amount of cash?” asked Karen Petrosyan, a California businessman who owned the truck.

Petrosyan refuses to admit there’s anything suspicious about the stash that police discovered. Officers later released his father, who was driving the truck, without filing a single charge — and authorities cut a deal that let Petrosyan come to Tennessee to get his big rig back.
Read officers’ narrative about why money seized

“If I am a criminal, if they allege me to be a criminal,” Petrosyan told NewsChannel 5 Investigates, “why would they settle? They do not just let criminals go.”

District Attorney General Kim Helper said that “in general, it was seized because — based upon our evidence and probable cause — it’s illegal drug proceeds.”

Still, Helper admitted that what makes the Petrosyan case a bit unusual is the location. The traffic stop occurred in Smith County, near the Carthage exit. But the officers work for Helper’s 21st Judicial District Drug Task Force out of Franklin — more than an hour away.

Her officers patrol that area under a deal where they give a third of any cash they seize to the agency that owns that stretch of road.
Read the agreement between the 21st and 15th judicial districts

“It’s a way to make money … for your task force?”NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Helper.

The DA paused.

“Honestly?” we asked, prompting a smile from Helper.

“Well, you know, when you say ‘make money,’ I guess it is a way for us to continue to fund our operations so that we can put an end to drug trafficking and the drug trade within this district,” she responded.

In fact, Interstate 40 has become a major profit center for Tennessee law enforcement — with officers stopping and often searching out-of-state vehicles. It’s because of a state law that lets them seize money simply based on the suspicion that it’s linked to drug trafficking.

If an owner does not take legal action to get the money back, the agency gets to keep it all.

“This is really highway shakedowns coming to the U.S.,” said Scott Bullock, senior attorney with the Washington-based Institute for Justice.

Last year, the conservative-leaning group issued a report — “Policing for Profit” — that gave Tennessee a D-minus for civil forfeiture laws that make that it all possible.
Read the “Policing for Profit” report here

“Under civil forfeiture,” Bullock said, “you give law enforcement a direct and perverse incentive to go out and try to take as much property from citizens as possible.”

Dickson Police Chief Ricky Chandler said, “What we are doing, we’re taking advantage of how the laws are, to use the money to be able to put back to fight the drugs.”

Chandler heads the board for the 23rd Judicial District Drug Task Force, which has made millions off seizures in its counties — Humphreys, Dickson and Cheatham.  The town of Fairview also provides officers to the Task Force in exchange for a cut of the cash.

Then, three years ago, Chandler and the Dickson County sheriff helped create a second team — known as Dickson Interdiction Criminal Enforcement, or DICE — to work the exact same stretches of interstate.

Humphreys County and the town of Kingston Springs provide officers — and Cheatham County allows DICE to work in its jurisdiction — in exchange for a share of the money.
Read the agreement for the creation of DICE

“Everything’s paid through seizures and fines,” Chandler said.

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, “So if these officers out on the interstate don’t come up with cash, then they might lose their jobs?”

“Well, it’s a possibility, yes,” Chandler answered.

Out on I-40, interdiction officers have a choice: Conventional wisdom is that the drugs come in from Mexico on the eastbound side. But the money goes back on the west.

While both agencies have made some big drug cases, we spotted both the 23rd and DICE staging time and time again with their backs to the drug side.

In fact, a review of daily activity sheets kept by the 23rd discovered that, when officers noted the location of their traffic stops, there were 10 times as many stops on the money side.
Review activity sheets for 23rd DTF, Oct-Dec 2010
Review summary of 23rd DTF cases, 2009-2010

Both DICE and the 21st Judicial District say they do not keep such daily activity reports.

UPDATE: A review of case summaries supplied by DICE shows that the entire team made one drug seizure — 602 grams of heroin — from Interstate 40 in all of 2010.  Those officers arrested six people during stops on I-40 during that same 12-month period — four of them on fugitive warrants, not for drug possession.  Most DICE cases were seizures of money in the westbound lanes.
Review summary of DICE cases, 2010

“We want both sides of the road worked,” Chandler insisted.

NewsChannel 5 Investigates noted, “It looks like that they are not concerned about stopping the drugs, they just want the money.”

“That’s what it looks like,” the chief admitted.

Is that the case?

“That shouldn’t be the case, but that’s what it looks like.”

Scott Bullock with the Institute for Justice said that “it shows that the police are really focusing, not on trying to get the drugs, not on trying to enforce the drug laws and stop that flow throughout the country. They’re focused on getting the money.”

And it can lead to turf wars.

After DICE got a $1 million seizure last fall, police video shows that a DICE officer suddenly found himself being blocked by a unit from the 23rd while watching the westbound lanes. Within minutes, five units from the 23rd were lined up in a show of force.

As a result, the two agencies had to work out a “letter of agreement,” specifying who would have priority on the westbound lanes on which days.
Read the letter of agreement between the 23rd and DICE

Then, there’s a 2008 video where a unit from the 23rd cuts in front of a DICE unit on a stop, prompting this heated exchange:

23rd DTF Officer: “Leave me the f***k alone!”
DICE Officer: “Let me tell you something…”
23rd DTF Officer: “Punk!”
DICE Officer: “You ever come up [on] me and try to wreck me out again, it will be your last time. You understand?”

Chandler called those disputes “ridiculous.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates noted, “You’ve got two agencies fighting to stop the same cars.”

“Competition can be a good thing,” the chief said, “as long as you don’t violate any person’s rights.”

But they’re competing for the money that they can take off of drivers.

“Well, they are competing to do their jobs is what they are competing for,” he insisted.

It’s a job that, Bullock said, has lost its way. “Law enforcement is supposed to be about getting the bad guys. It’s not supposed to be about making money.”

Law enforcement authorities say their goal is to hit the drug traffickers in the pocketbook.

But some people have hired lawyers after their cash was taken and, sometimes after months and months of litigation, judges have ruled that the money that was taken from them really had nothing to do with drug dealing at all.

E-mail: pwilliams@newschannel5.com 

Back to NC5 Investigates: Policing for Profit

Cops Pose as DHS, Steal Pizza, Punch Clerk

Posted in General, New World Order, News, Police State/Martial Law with tags , , , , on May 12, 2010 by truthwillrise

Infowars.com
May 11, 2010

‘Uh-Oh They’re Here’

Posted in Attack on Freedom, General, Legal, New World Order, News, Police State/Martial Law, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , on August 20, 2009 by truthwillrise

A persistent blogger annoys police — and winds up in jail.

Monday, August 10, 2009

A 34-YEAR-OLD woman, the mother of a 12-year-old girl, has been locked up in a Virginia jail for three weeks and could remain there for at least another month. Her crime? Blogging about the police.

Elisha Strom, who appears unable to make the $750 bail, was arrested outside Charlottesville on July 16 when police raided her house, confiscating notebooks, computers and camera equipment. Although the Charlottesville police chief, Timothy J. Longo Sr., had previously written to Ms. Strom warning her that her blog posts were interfering with the work of a local drug enforcement task force, she was not charged with obstruction of justice or any similar offense. Rather, she was indicted on a single count of identifying a police officer with intent to harass, a felony under state law.

It’s fair to say that Ms. Strom was unusually focused on the Jefferson Area Drug Enforcement task force, a 14-year-old unit drawn mainly from the police departments of Charlottesville, Albemarle County and the University of Virginia. (Her blog at http://iheartejade.blogspot.com, expresses the view that the task force is “nothing more than a group of arrogant thugs.”) In a nearly year-long barrage of blog posts, she published snapshots she took in public of many or most of the task force’s officers; detailed their comings and goings by following them in her car; mused about their habits and looks; hinted that she may have had a personal relationship with one of them; and, in one instance, reported that she had tipped off a local newspaper about their movements.

Predictably, this annoyed law enforcement officials, who, it’s fair to guess, comprised much of her readership before her arrest. But what seems to have sent them over the edge — and skewed their judgment — is Ms. Strom’s decision to post the name and address of one of the officers with a street-view photo of his house.

All this information was publicly available, including the photograph, which Ms. Strom gleaned from municipal records. The task force’s officers may have worked undercover on occasion, but one wonders about their undercover abilities, given that Ms. Strom was able to out them so consistently. Chief Longo warned Ms. Strom that her blog posts were scaring off informants and endangering the officers and their families, but he provided no evidence. At no point did Ms. Strom’s blog express a threat, explicit or otherwise, to police or their sources.

Ms. Strom is not the most sympathetic symbol of free-speech rights. She has previously advocated creating a separate, all-white nation, and her blog veers from the whimsical to the self-righteous to the bizarre. But the real problem here is the Virginia statute, in which an overly broad, ill-defined ban on harassment-by-identification, specifically in regard to police officers, seems to criminalize just about anything that might irritate targets.

It should not be a crime to annoy the cops, whose raid on Ms. Strom’s house looks more like a fit of pique than an act of law enforcement. Some of her postings may have consisted of obnoxious speech, but they were nonetheless speech and constitutionally protected. That would hold true right up through her last blog post, written as the police raid on her home began at 7 a.m.: “Uh-Oh They’re Here.”

Obama Backs Bush Policy On Detainee Rights

Posted in New World Order, News, Police State/Martial Law, Stupid Government Tricks, Truth/Freedom, Unconstitutional with tags , , , , on March 4, 2009 by truthwillrise

Administration Shocks Human Rights Groups, Saying Prisoners At Bagram Air Force Base Cannot Challenge Their Detention

The Obama Justice Department said Friday, Feb. 20, 2009 that it would back a key Bush Administration terrorism policy, denying constitutional rights to detainees held at Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan.  (CBS/AP)

 

Answers.com

(AP) 

President Barack Obama’s Justice Department sided with the former Bush administration on Friday, saying detainees in Afghanistan have no constitutional rights.

In a two-sentence court filing, department lawyers said the Obama administration agreed that detainees at Bagram Air Base cannot use U.S. courts to challenge their detention. The filing shocked human rights attorneys.

“The hope we all had in President Obama to lead us on a different path has not turned out as we’d hoped,” said Tina Monshipour Foster, a human rights attorney representing a detainee at the Bagram Air Base. “We all expected better.”

In midyear last year, the Supreme Court gave al Qaeda and Taliban suspects held at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the right to challenge their detention. With about 600 detainees at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan and thousands more held in Iraq, courts are grappling with whether they, too, can sue to be released.

Three months after the Supreme Court’s ruling on Guantanamo Bay, four Afghan citizens being detained at Bagram tried to challenge their detentions in U.S. District Court in Washington. Court filings alleged that the U.S. military had held them without charges, repeatedly interrogating them without any means to contact an attorney. Their petition was filed for them by relatives since they had no way of getting access to the legal system.

The military has determined that all the detainees at Bagram are “enemy combatants.” The Bush administration said in a response to the petition last year that the enemy combatant status of the Bagram detainees is reviewed every six months, taking into consideration classified intelligence and testimony from those involved in their capture and interrogation.

After Mr. Obama took office, a federal judge in Washington gave the new administration a month to decide whether it wanted to stand by Bush’s legal argument. Justice Department spokesman Dean Boyd says the filing speaks for itself.

“They’ve now embraced the Bush policy that you can create prisons outside the law,” said Jonathan Hafetz, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union who has represented several detainees.

The Justice Department argues that Bagram is different from Guantanamo Bay because it is in an overseas war zone and the prisoners there are being held as part of a continuing military action. The government argues that releasing enemy combatants into the Afghan war zone, or even diverting U.S. personnel there to consider their legal cases, could threaten security.

They’ve now embraced the Bush policy that you can create prisons outside the law.

Jonathan Hafetz
American Civil Liberties Union attorney

The government also said that if the Bagram detainees had access to the courts, it would allow all foreigners captured by the United States in conflicts worldwide to do the same.

It Is not the first time that the Obama administration has used a Bush administration legal argument after promising to review it. Last week, Attorney General Eric Holder announced a review of every court case in which the Bush administration invoked the state secrets privilege, a separate legal tool it used to have lawsuits thrown out rather than reveal secrets.

The same day, however, civil division attorney Douglas Letter cited that privilege in asking an appeals court to uphold dismissal of a lawsuit accusing a Boeing Co. subsidiary of illegally helping the CIA fly suspected terrorists to allied foreign nations that tortured them.

Letter said that Mr. Obama officials approved his argument.