Archive for May, 2011

BREAKING NEWS! Settlement Reached in Bishop Eddie Long Case (He Paid Them Hush Money)

Posted in Business, Corruption, False Teachers, General, Legal, News, Pulpit Pimps with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 27, 2011 by truthwillrise

Uploaded by  on May 26, 2011

Source: http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/dpp/news/laywer%3A-settlement-reached-in-bishop-e…

Eddie Long: Settlement Reached in Bishop Eddie Long Case (He Paid Them Hush Money)

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Video Shows Officer Offering Truckers Freedom For Cash

Posted in Attack on Freedom, Corruption, New World Order, News, Police State/Martial Law, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2011 by truthwillrise

By Phil Williams
Chief Investigative Reporter

Video of the traffic stop

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — New video obtained byNewsChannel 5 Investigates shows an interstate interdiction officer offering to trade the freedom of two truckers — for their cash.

The DA says it’s good police work.

But critics say it’s a prime example of how the rules have been twisted by laws that let agencies keep the money they seize.

The video — obtained under the Tennessee Public Records Act — shows a May 2010 traffic stop in rural Hickman County, on a darkened stretch of westbound Interstate 40.

There, two California truckers were given a tough choice: potentially face a criminal prosecution or hand over the cash that the interdiction officer suspects is hidden somewhere in their tractor trailer.

“You’re going to have to trust me, or you’re going to out on a limb and see what happens once we find it,” the officer told the truckers.

Before the night was up, agents recovered piles of suspected drug money — almost a half a million dollars — money that their agency, the 21st Judicial District Drug Task Force, will get to keep.
Read officers’ narrative about why money seized

“I will do everything I can to take that money out of the hands of those drug dealers and the cartel,” District Attorney General Kim Helper toldNewsChannel 5 Investigates.

But Helper said the two truckers — who she believes were drug couriers — got to walk without even being asked to name their accomplices because she believes they had not really committed a crime that she could prosecute.

“The transportation of illegal drug proceeds through the state of Tennessee from my reading of the statute is not a crime,” Helper insisted.

The incident began as a routine traffic stop, except in this case agents are specifically looking for drug money heading back to Mexico.

Officer: “You say you’re not traveling with anything illegal in your truck, right? No drugs? And you’re not traveling with any large amounts of U.S. currency?”
Trucker: “No, sir. No, sir. No, sir.”
Officer: “You wouldn’t have a problem if I searched your truck or your trailer for any of the items mentioned?”
Driver: “Not at all.”

As the time passed, suspicions were aroused by discrepancies in the truckers’ stories, but officers were not finding anything up in the refrigerated trailer, known as a reefer.

So the agent began threatening the truckers with criminal prosecution.

Officer: “Money laundering is what it’s called, and it’s a federal offense. The good thing for you is when we seize money we don’t deal with the feds. We seize it ourselves.  And if it ain’t your money and you say ‘Agent Owens, it ain’t my money, I don’t know how it got there…'”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked the DA if the officer was not suggesting to the truck driver that his defense would be that he did not know how the money got there.

“I don’t think he is,” she answered, “because I think he recognizes at this point that the transport of money just through the state is not a crime under our money laundering statute.”

Yet, these are some of the statements that the officer made:

Officer: “Here’s the thing, alright. Don’t talk to him, just listen. Just listen. Do you want to go home?”
Trucker: “I sure do.”
Officer: “Does it not make sense that I’m trying to help you… because you honestly can’t think for a second that we ain’t going to stay here until we find it.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates told Helper that the officer “sure is making this guy think he’s committed a crime.”

“Well, as I indicated to you,” she responded, “law enforcement agents use various means of questioning to get as much information as they can.”

But if someone has not committed a crime, is it proper for a police officer to make that person think that they have?

“I believe,” Helper said, “that officers can use a variety of techniques.”

The officer also assured the driver, that if they would cough up the cash, they would not be asked to rat out their accomplices.

Officer: “Hey, I’m not asking you if you have knowledge about it, and I won’t ask you if you have knowledge about it. You understand me? It’s not my job…. All I’m asking you is, where’s the money?”

Officer: “I don’t even care where you got it. I want the product. That’s what I’m after.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates said to the DA that “throughout this incident the officers tell him you do not have to tell us where you got this money.”

Is that police work?

“Police work,” Helper said, “to the extent that these officers, from my perspective,  are trying to work with these guys who are merely the couriers.”

Still, we pressed, “At no point does any officer ever ask, ‘What’s the name of the big fish in this case?'”

“Right, right,” the DA acknowledged. “And I agree with you. Should they have asked it? Maybe.”

Finally, an hour into the traffic stop, the driver came clean.

Officer: “We’ll come back and you sign these forms saying you don’t know anything about it, you’re disclaiming it, it’s not yours and it’s done.”
Driver: “It’s in the back of the reefer. I don’t know how it got there.”
Officer: “OK.”
Driver: “It’s not mine.”
Officer: “We’re good!”

A short time later, the task force would be half a million dollars richer.

Still, the DA admitted that she isn’t completely happy with the outcome.

“I would love to see our legislature make a change so that we can make those arrests on the sides of the roads with these guys.”

We also found cases in the Dickson area where subjects admitted that the money was from drugs. Not only were they released, but we’re told that the video evidence of those stops was later destroyed.
Subject admitted $161,500 “was illegal drug money”
Subject admitted $46,500 “was illegal drug money”
Subject admitted $59,760 “was illegal drug money”
Subject admitted $198,000 “from the sale of cocaine”
Subject admitted $800,495 “from the sales of marijuana”

Still, a Nashville prosecutor, who was involved in drafting the state’s money laundering statute, tells NewsChannel 5 Investigates that he thinks the law could be used to bring criminal charges against some people running money for the drug cartels.

Helper says she’ll now ask lawmakers to clarify the law — something that apparently no DA had bothered to do before our investigation.

E-mail: pwilliams@newschannel5.com 

Back to NC5 Investigates: Policing for Profit

Middle Tennessee Police Profiting Off Drug Trade?

Posted in Attack on Freedom, Business, Corruption, economic tyranny, Economy, News, Police State/Martial Law, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2011 by truthwillrise

Poilce Corruption

By Phil Williams
Chief Investigative Reporter

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A major NewsChannel 5 investigation has uncovered serious questions about Tennessee’s war on drugs. Among the questions: are some police agencies more concerned about making money off the drugs, than stopping them?

At the center of this months-long investigation are laws that let officers pull driver over looking for cash.  Those officers do not even have to file criminal charges against a person to take his/her money.

It turns out, those kind of stops are now happening almost every day in Middle Tennessee.

Case in point: a 2009 stop where a tractor trailer was stopped for a traffic violation, leading to a search and the discovery of large blocks containing almost $200,000 cash — cash that officers keep on the suspicion that it’s drug money.

“What’s wrong with having a large amount of cash?” asked Karen Petrosyan, a California businessman who owned the truck.

Petrosyan refuses to admit there’s anything suspicious about the stash that police discovered. Officers later released his father, who was driving the truck, without filing a single charge — and authorities cut a deal that let Petrosyan come to Tennessee to get his big rig back.
Read officers’ narrative about why money seized

“If I am a criminal, if they allege me to be a criminal,” Petrosyan told NewsChannel 5 Investigates, “why would they settle? They do not just let criminals go.”

District Attorney General Kim Helper said that “in general, it was seized because — based upon our evidence and probable cause — it’s illegal drug proceeds.”

Still, Helper admitted that what makes the Petrosyan case a bit unusual is the location. The traffic stop occurred in Smith County, near the Carthage exit. But the officers work for Helper’s 21st Judicial District Drug Task Force out of Franklin — more than an hour away.

Her officers patrol that area under a deal where they give a third of any cash they seize to the agency that owns that stretch of road.
Read the agreement between the 21st and 15th judicial districts

“It’s a way to make money … for your task force?”NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Helper.

The DA paused.

“Honestly?” we asked, prompting a smile from Helper.

“Well, you know, when you say ‘make money,’ I guess it is a way for us to continue to fund our operations so that we can put an end to drug trafficking and the drug trade within this district,” she responded.

In fact, Interstate 40 has become a major profit center for Tennessee law enforcement — with officers stopping and often searching out-of-state vehicles. It’s because of a state law that lets them seize money simply based on the suspicion that it’s linked to drug trafficking.

If an owner does not take legal action to get the money back, the agency gets to keep it all.

“This is really highway shakedowns coming to the U.S.,” said Scott Bullock, senior attorney with the Washington-based Institute for Justice.

Last year, the conservative-leaning group issued a report — “Policing for Profit” — that gave Tennessee a D-minus for civil forfeiture laws that make that it all possible.
Read the “Policing for Profit” report here

“Under civil forfeiture,” Bullock said, “you give law enforcement a direct and perverse incentive to go out and try to take as much property from citizens as possible.”

Dickson Police Chief Ricky Chandler said, “What we are doing, we’re taking advantage of how the laws are, to use the money to be able to put back to fight the drugs.”

Chandler heads the board for the 23rd Judicial District Drug Task Force, which has made millions off seizures in its counties — Humphreys, Dickson and Cheatham.  The town of Fairview also provides officers to the Task Force in exchange for a cut of the cash.

Then, three years ago, Chandler and the Dickson County sheriff helped create a second team — known as Dickson Interdiction Criminal Enforcement, or DICE — to work the exact same stretches of interstate.

Humphreys County and the town of Kingston Springs provide officers — and Cheatham County allows DICE to work in its jurisdiction — in exchange for a share of the money.
Read the agreement for the creation of DICE

“Everything’s paid through seizures and fines,” Chandler said.

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, “So if these officers out on the interstate don’t come up with cash, then they might lose their jobs?”

“Well, it’s a possibility, yes,” Chandler answered.

Out on I-40, interdiction officers have a choice: Conventional wisdom is that the drugs come in from Mexico on the eastbound side. But the money goes back on the west.

While both agencies have made some big drug cases, we spotted both the 23rd and DICE staging time and time again with their backs to the drug side.

In fact, a review of daily activity sheets kept by the 23rd discovered that, when officers noted the location of their traffic stops, there were 10 times as many stops on the money side.
Review activity sheets for 23rd DTF, Oct-Dec 2010
Review summary of 23rd DTF cases, 2009-2010

Both DICE and the 21st Judicial District say they do not keep such daily activity reports.

UPDATE: A review of case summaries supplied by DICE shows that the entire team made one drug seizure — 602 grams of heroin — from Interstate 40 in all of 2010.  Those officers arrested six people during stops on I-40 during that same 12-month period — four of them on fugitive warrants, not for drug possession.  Most DICE cases were seizures of money in the westbound lanes.
Review summary of DICE cases, 2010

“We want both sides of the road worked,” Chandler insisted.

NewsChannel 5 Investigates noted, “It looks like that they are not concerned about stopping the drugs, they just want the money.”

“That’s what it looks like,” the chief admitted.

Is that the case?

“That shouldn’t be the case, but that’s what it looks like.”

Scott Bullock with the Institute for Justice said that “it shows that the police are really focusing, not on trying to get the drugs, not on trying to enforce the drug laws and stop that flow throughout the country. They’re focused on getting the money.”

And it can lead to turf wars.

After DICE got a $1 million seizure last fall, police video shows that a DICE officer suddenly found himself being blocked by a unit from the 23rd while watching the westbound lanes. Within minutes, five units from the 23rd were lined up in a show of force.

As a result, the two agencies had to work out a “letter of agreement,” specifying who would have priority on the westbound lanes on which days.
Read the letter of agreement between the 23rd and DICE

Then, there’s a 2008 video where a unit from the 23rd cuts in front of a DICE unit on a stop, prompting this heated exchange:

23rd DTF Officer: “Leave me the f***k alone!”
DICE Officer: “Let me tell you something…”
23rd DTF Officer: “Punk!”
DICE Officer: “You ever come up [on] me and try to wreck me out again, it will be your last time. You understand?”

Chandler called those disputes “ridiculous.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates noted, “You’ve got two agencies fighting to stop the same cars.”

“Competition can be a good thing,” the chief said, “as long as you don’t violate any person’s rights.”

But they’re competing for the money that they can take off of drivers.

“Well, they are competing to do their jobs is what they are competing for,” he insisted.

It’s a job that, Bullock said, has lost its way. “Law enforcement is supposed to be about getting the bad guys. It’s not supposed to be about making money.”

Law enforcement authorities say their goal is to hit the drug traffickers in the pocketbook.

But some people have hired lawyers after their cash was taken and, sometimes after months and months of litigation, judges have ruled that the money that was taken from them really had nothing to do with drug dealing at all.

E-mail: pwilliams@newschannel5.com 

Back to NC5 Investigates: Policing for Profit

Questionable Traffic Stops Caught On Camera

Posted in Attack on Freedom, Attack on the Republic, Corruption, economic tyranny, News, Police State/Martial Law, Stupid Government Tricks, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2011 by truthwillrise

Questionable Police Stop

By Phil Williams
Chief Investigative Reporter

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — NewsChannel 5’s cameras caught a police stop in progress, and it is now at the center of an internal police investigation.

It’s the result of a NewsChannel 5 investigation into interstate drug agents who stop lots of out-of-state drivers west of Nashville, looking for drugs or — more often — drug money.

Now, the head of one of those agencies tellsNewsChannel 5 Investigates that he wants to make sure all of those stops are legal.

“It’s got to a legitimate, lawful stop,” said Dickson Police Chief Ricky Chandler.

Chandler chairs the board of the 23rd Judicial District Drug Task Force and serves on the board of the Dickson Interdiction and Criminal Enforcement (DICE) unit, both of which patrol a 50-mile stretch of Interstate 40 west of Nashville.

For a whole day, NewsChannel 5 Investigateswent on patrol with DICE officers, seeing how traffic violations searches that they hope will yield drugs or, like in one case, a stash of more than $200,000 of suspected drug money.

A DICE officer told us that the traffic stop is key.

“We’re not allowed to pull over anybody just for the sake of pulling them over,” he said.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates was also watching from Sky 5 and had questions about this stop where a supervisor from the 23rd pulled over two Hispanic men in an SUV with Texas plates.

His explanation was caught on his in-car video:

“Hey, the reason why I stopped you was you were coming outside your lane of travel. I don’t know if you’re getting sleepy or you’re not drinking are you?”

Yet, our camera had been tracking that same supervisor and captured the exact moment that he put on his brakes — just as he was about to pass the Texas vehicle. The video shows that the SUV was squarely between the lines.

For almost two minutes, the interdiction vehicle trailed the Texas SUV. While the officer himself was all over the road, it was another story for the two Hispanic men.

We showed the video to Chief Chandler.

“[On] the tape, it was not weaving. It did not cross the line — you’re right,” he said.

“He never weaved once, did he?” we asked.

“No, he stayed within his lane of traffic.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained other videos from that same 23rd Drug Task Force supervisor, where he stopped out-of-state drivers and never even told them that they violated any traffic laws.

“I can’t explain,” Chandler said. “He should be doing that. He’s been trained. He knows how to do that, and he should be doing that.”

Still, neither of the agencies operating in the Dickson area have their cameras set to record the traffic violations that make the stops legal.

“From their perspective, I don’t know how it would benefit them to record that,” said Nashville attorney Dominic Leonardo.

Leonardo said that a defense lawyer could use such video to fight a case. But, without it, it’s the out-of-state driver’s word against the word of a sworn police officer.

“If you have no other evidence there, then chances are the person who’s hearing this case over the seizure of money or the criminal aspect if there [are] criminal charges brought, the police officer is going to win,” he added.

Then, after the traffic stop comes the part where, if officers have suspicions about a driver, even if they don’t really have a legal reason to search the vehicle, there’s nothing to stop them from trying to persuade the person to let them search.

Take, for example, a stop observed from Sky 5 where an out-of-state driver was detained for more than 20 minutes while agents from the 23rd searched his car.

“This is a very fine line between a good stop where there may be a bust to it — or basically a legit guy and a complaint,” that same supervisor told a fellow officer.

He suggested that they use the driver’s claim that he has worked with police as an interpreter.

“Play it off like he’s one of us. Hey, if you could do us a favor, if I get another search out of the way, I get to go to lunch.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Chandler if it is “OK to trick people into consenting to searches.”

“Power of persuasion and tricking are two different things,” the chief answered, “and I think you’ve got to be able to be persuasive to get searches if you’ve got hunches.”

In another case, the supervisor bluffed the passenger in a car.

“Would there be any reason why we might have received a phone call and been told that this vehicle was transporting a large amount of cash?” he asked.

In fact, it was a lie — and the search found nothing.

We noted to Chandler that the two agencies are “pulling lots of people off the interstate,” applying the same techniques. “Is there any part of that that bothers you?”

“No,” he said, “as long as it’s a legal traffic stop.”

As for the questionable traffic stop caught by Sky 5, “Rest assured, if I can get a copy of this tape it will be looked into…. That doesn’t look good at all.”

NewsChannel 5 provided Chandler with a copy of the video and posted it online here. (At one point, the Texas SUV moves out of the frame — except for the left mirror which can be seen tracking the dotted, white line.)

Chandler said he’s also looking at other policy changes are needed.

E-mail: pwilliams@newschannel5.com 

Back to NC5 Investigates: Policing for Profit