Archive for Theft

Questionable Traffic Stops Caught On Camera

Posted in Attack on Freedom, Attack on the Republic, Corruption, economic tyranny, News, Police State/Martial Law, Stupid Government Tricks, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 21, 2011 by truthwillrise

Questionable Police Stop

By Phil Williams
Chief Investigative Reporter

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — NewsChannel 5’s cameras caught a police stop in progress, and it is now at the center of an internal police investigation.

It’s the result of a NewsChannel 5 investigation into interstate drug agents who stop lots of out-of-state drivers west of Nashville, looking for drugs or — more often — drug money.

Now, the head of one of those agencies tellsNewsChannel 5 Investigates that he wants to make sure all of those stops are legal.

“It’s got to a legitimate, lawful stop,” said Dickson Police Chief Ricky Chandler.

Chandler chairs the board of the 23rd Judicial District Drug Task Force and serves on the board of the Dickson Interdiction and Criminal Enforcement (DICE) unit, both of which patrol a 50-mile stretch of Interstate 40 west of Nashville.

For a whole day, NewsChannel 5 Investigateswent on patrol with DICE officers, seeing how traffic violations searches that they hope will yield drugs or, like in one case, a stash of more than $200,000 of suspected drug money.

A DICE officer told us that the traffic stop is key.

“We’re not allowed to pull over anybody just for the sake of pulling them over,” he said.

But NewsChannel 5 Investigates was also watching from Sky 5 and had questions about this stop where a supervisor from the 23rd pulled over two Hispanic men in an SUV with Texas plates.

His explanation was caught on his in-car video:

“Hey, the reason why I stopped you was you were coming outside your lane of travel. I don’t know if you’re getting sleepy or you’re not drinking are you?”

Yet, our camera had been tracking that same supervisor and captured the exact moment that he put on his brakes — just as he was about to pass the Texas vehicle. The video shows that the SUV was squarely between the lines.

For almost two minutes, the interdiction vehicle trailed the Texas SUV. While the officer himself was all over the road, it was another story for the two Hispanic men.

We showed the video to Chief Chandler.

“[On] the tape, it was not weaving. It did not cross the line — you’re right,” he said.

“He never weaved once, did he?” we asked.

“No, he stayed within his lane of traffic.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates obtained other videos from that same 23rd Drug Task Force supervisor, where he stopped out-of-state drivers and never even told them that they violated any traffic laws.

“I can’t explain,” Chandler said. “He should be doing that. He’s been trained. He knows how to do that, and he should be doing that.”

Still, neither of the agencies operating in the Dickson area have their cameras set to record the traffic violations that make the stops legal.

“From their perspective, I don’t know how it would benefit them to record that,” said Nashville attorney Dominic Leonardo.

Leonardo said that a defense lawyer could use such video to fight a case. But, without it, it’s the out-of-state driver’s word against the word of a sworn police officer.

“If you have no other evidence there, then chances are the person who’s hearing this case over the seizure of money or the criminal aspect if there [are] criminal charges brought, the police officer is going to win,” he added.

Then, after the traffic stop comes the part where, if officers have suspicions about a driver, even if they don’t really have a legal reason to search the vehicle, there’s nothing to stop them from trying to persuade the person to let them search.

Take, for example, a stop observed from Sky 5 where an out-of-state driver was detained for more than 20 minutes while agents from the 23rd searched his car.

“This is a very fine line between a good stop where there may be a bust to it — or basically a legit guy and a complaint,” that same supervisor told a fellow officer.

He suggested that they use the driver’s claim that he has worked with police as an interpreter.

“Play it off like he’s one of us. Hey, if you could do us a favor, if I get another search out of the way, I get to go to lunch.”

NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Chandler if it is “OK to trick people into consenting to searches.”

“Power of persuasion and tricking are two different things,” the chief answered, “and I think you’ve got to be able to be persuasive to get searches if you’ve got hunches.”

In another case, the supervisor bluffed the passenger in a car.

“Would there be any reason why we might have received a phone call and been told that this vehicle was transporting a large amount of cash?” he asked.

In fact, it was a lie — and the search found nothing.

We noted to Chandler that the two agencies are “pulling lots of people off the interstate,” applying the same techniques. “Is there any part of that that bothers you?”

“No,” he said, “as long as it’s a legal traffic stop.”

As for the questionable traffic stop caught by Sky 5, “Rest assured, if I can get a copy of this tape it will be looked into…. That doesn’t look good at all.”

NewsChannel 5 provided Chandler with a copy of the video and posted it online here. (At one point, the Texas SUV moves out of the frame — except for the left mirror which can be seen tracking the dotted, white line.)

Chandler said he’s also looking at other policy changes are needed.

E-mail: pwilliams@newschannel5.com 

Back to NC5 Investigates: Policing for Profit

Ex-Informant Charged With Largest Credit Card Heist in US

Posted in Business, Economy, General, Identity Theft, Legal, News with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 20, 2009 by truthwillrise

y Erika Morphy
E-Commerce Times 
Part of the ECT News Network 
08/18/09 1:55 PM PT

New charges have been brought against a hacker already awaiting trials in two other cases of identity theft. In the latest indictment, 28-year-old Albert Gonzalez is accused of participating in the theft of 130 million credit card numbers. Two others are charged with conspiring in the crime.

Albert Gonzalez, 28, a hacker already in jail awaiting trial for what was deemed the largest identity theft in the U.S., has apparently topped himself. Along with two unnamed coconspirators, Gonzalez has been indicted by a federal grand jury in New Jersey for an identity theft that trumps the previous record-setter: 130 million credit and debit card numbers stolen over a two-year period, from 2006 to 2008.

At one point, Gonzalez was working as an informant with the U.S. Secret Service to hunt hackers, while at the same time allegedly stealing data.

Storied Resume

In August 2008, the Department of Justice fingered Gonzalez as the ringleader of a hacker gang that stole 40 million credit card numbers — then believed to be the largest single case of hacking theft. Consumers at T.J. Maxx, Barnes & Noble, Sports Authority and OfficeMax were victimized in that raid. Those charges were filed in the District of Massachusetts. Gonzalez will face them in a trial scheduled to begin in 2010.

In May 2008, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York charged Gonzalez in connection with the hacking of a computer network run by a national restaurant chain. Trial on those charges is scheduled to begin in Long Island, N.Y., in September 2009.

This latest episode is also the most audacious, according to the Department of Justice. The Miami-based Gonzalez and two Russian accomplices hacked into corporate databases five times over a two-year time period, using a SQL injection attack to target 7-Eleven, Heartland Payment Systems and Hannaford Brothers, a Maine-based supermarket chain, among other companies.

The three allegedly hacked into the networks and placed backdoor access in the systems to allow them to revisit without detection in order to steal the data. They would then send the data to servers in California, Illinois, Latvia, the Netherlands and Ukraine for resale to criminals.

If convicted, Gonzalez faces up to 35 years in prison and US$500,000 in fines.

The Department of Justice did not return the E-Commerce Times’ call requesting comment in time for publication.

The fact that Gonzalez acted as an informant for the Secret Service and then turned around and played the government “is a common problem in law enforcement — but particularly acute in the prosecution of cybercrimes,” said Alexander H. Southwell, an attorney with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher’s white collar defense and investigations practice.

“That is because prosecutors and law enforcement are very dependent on using insiders to penetrate criminal activity,” Southwell told the E-Commerce Times. “These cases are hard to crack without somebody on the inside because of the nature of cybercrime.”

Informers have a tendency to think that because they have protection from the government, they get a free pass on anything else they want to do, he noted.

Familiar Environment

Apart from the James Bond elements of these cases, they’re much the same as other massive identity thefts. Despite episode after episode, the underlying breeding ground hasn’t changed. That environment is characterized both by the government’s patchwork approach to protection — which often allows perpetrators to escape undetected — and the reluctance of retailers to implement stronger security measures.

The United States follows a “sectoral” approach to cybersecurity, M. Peter Adler, an attorney at Pepper Hamilton, told the E-Commerce Times.

“This means that regulations and industry standards pertaining to information security may vary slightly for companies in healthcare, financial services, [firms that have] government contracts or that use payment cards,” he explained.

“Layer state laws on this, such as those in Massachusetts and California, and a company is left with a patchwork quilt of protections that are often not completely understood and that can result in security gaps,” said Adler, adding that what the country really needs is a unified and comprehensive approach to cybersecurity that will keep up with the hackers.

The private sector must step up as well, said Robert Siciliano, CEO of IDTheftSecurity.com.

“Credit card companies, banks and retailers … clearly make huge profits that trump the losses from fraud — otherwise, they’d do something to stop fraud,” Siciliano told the E-Commerce Times.

“Credit card fraud can be stopped dead with numerous technologies that make the data useless to the thieves,” he noted, “but until banks, retailers and the credit card companies adopt them, the bleeding will continue.”

The recession is not helping, either.

Even if the government were strongly pushing more protective measures, said Adam Levin, cofounder of Identity Theft 911, it would have to balance those against the inevitable legitimate purchases stymied by such measures.

Furthermore, state governments in the forefront of enforcement have been forced to cut back because of budget cuts, he told the E-Commerce Times.

“Ultimately, it won’t be the government that solves this problem, but ultimate regulators of our economy — class action attorneys,” Levin concluded

 

 

 

 

 

 

           This is just another instance of personal information being stolen and tens of millions are now potential victims of Identity              Theft. It once again goes to show people it is not what we are doing with our information, but what others do with that                      information that can cause plenty of trouble. If you are concerned that you may be affected by this latest breach, or just                        concerned about Identity Theft, please log on to http://www.prepaidlegal.com/idt/bking62 or call 1-866-510-7907.