Archive for June 29, 2009

The Money Masters – How International Bankers Gained Control of America

Posted in Attack on Freedom, economic tyranny, Economy, Fiat Currency, International Bankers, New World Order, Police State/Martial Law, Secret Societies, Shadow Government, The Federal Reserve, Tyranny with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 29, 2009 by truthwillrise

This film exposes how the international bankers sunk thier claws into the United States and what that has done to this nation. A must watch if you want to understand what is going on in this anti0on and the world.

 

Data breach hits Commonwealth Solar

Posted in Business, Economy, Identity Theft, Legal, News with tags , , , , on June 29, 2009 by truthwillrise

Boston Business Journal – by Jackie Noblett

About 810 residents who had applied for the Massachusetts Commonwealth Solar rebate program had their personal information posted on a government Web site for nearly an hour, according to a notice from the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative.

The quasi-public agency that administers the program said a file containing the names, addresses and Social Security numbers of customers and businesses was posted on the MTC’s Web site for 50 minutes June 25 before being taken down. The data breach affected most of the people who applied for the program. As of May 31, 846 residents had submitted applications.

A security consultant hired by the agency found that one user accessed the file during the incident.

“I sincerely apologize to our customers for this incident and any inconvenience or concern it may cause,” Massachusetts Technology Collaborative deputy executive director Philip Holahan said in a statement. “We are taking all possible steps to protect our customers’ information and ensure that such a breach does not happen again.”

The agency will provide free credit-monitoring services to those affected by the breach and will review its internal data security and encryption protocols. It has also informed the state attorney general’s office as well as the Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation, per an executive order signed by Gov. Deval Patrick last year.

Launched in 2008, the Commonwealth Solar program provides rebates to individuals, businesses and communities that install solar photovoltaic systems on their property. It is the major financial driver behind a state goal to install 250 megawatts of solar in Massachusetts by 2017.

 

If you were affected by this latest data breach, know anyone who was, or just concerned about Identity Theft, please call Brandon King at 1-866-510-7907 or go to http://www.greatworkplan.com/betterlife4u.

Make sure red flags rules are on your radar screen

Posted in Economy, Identity Theft, Legal, Life Improvement, News with tags , , , , , , , on June 29, 2009 by truthwillrise

Fri, 2009-06-26 14:47 — Steve Grant

Red Flags

There’s so much to keep tabs on … increasing regulation, rapidly fluctuating market conditions, changing lender relationships and more. Properly managing it all can make you feel like an air traffic controller. Here is one more thing that you should be aware of: The “Red Flags” rules, which go into effect May 1. By this date, it’s important to have detailed policies and procedures in place to effectively detect, prevent and mitigate identity theft. These rules, which have been in the pipeline for more than a year, call for an alert, proactive attitude toward protecting customers, including mortgage customers. Although there aren’t any criminal penalties for not following these rules, violators could be subject to civil monetary penalties. So consider identity theft a big “blip” on your personal radar.

Understanding the rules, and committing to following them, is just the first step. There’s the practical matter of being able to catch everything and prevent incidents. The latest technology can help you stay on top of it all without breaking a sweat.

How the “Red Flags” rules came to be
Each year, despite the best efforts of financial institutions and law enforcement, identity thieves devise new ways to steal personal information. In 2007 alone, more than 250,000 identity theft complaints were received by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), according to media reports.
Because of this ongoing concern, and the need for intensive action, a number of agencies including the FTC, bank regulatory agencies and the National Credit Union Administration created the Red Flags rules, as part of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA) of 2003, technically Sections 114 and 315. Identification and detection of patterns, practices or specific activities that could be related to identity theft are required, along with guidelines on specific, continual responses.

Who needs to be aware of this? Professionals at any financial institution that hold a “transaction account” belonging to a customer. This can include local banks, savings and loans and credit unions. Importantly for mortgage brokers, it also includes creditors, and the so-called “covered accounts” include mortgages. Also in the mix are finance companies, utilities and telecommunications companies.

What to look for
So how can you prevent identity theft as instances occur? There are several key pieces of information to look for, including:

◄ Alerts, notifications or warnings from consumer reporting agencies that suspicious activity may have taken place. This can include anything from excessive inquiries for information to an unusually high number of financial transactions, both of which might indicate fraud.

◄ Suspicious documents or personal identifying information. This would include documents that appear to be forged or contain information inconsistent with other pieces of identification.

◄ Unusual or suspicious activity on an account—noticeably different from typical activity.

◄ Information that comes directly from customers, victims of identity theft or law enforcement authorities.

Ongoing awareness is key. Some fraud can be caught in person, but technology is a great partner. There are plenty of services that provide pieces of information that can serve as notice about potential identity theft. The challenge is gathering all the information in a meaningful and easy-to-use way.

For example, each of the three major credit bureaus—Equifax, Experian and TransUnion—offer fraud prevention services as part of their credit report services. They flag phone numbers and addresses considered high risk, and when application information is submitted that doesn’t match what is already on file from the customer.

The systems also reports if there have been excessive credit inquiries on a given Social Security number, and tracks the use of Social Security numbers for deceased individuals or numbers not yet issued. Luckily, there are providers that consolidate information from the three agencies into one report.

Here’s another resource: Alerts by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) allow a professional to automatically check borrower records against the U.S. Treasury’s master list of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons, which contains thousands of individual names. These individuals may be more likely to commit fraud.

There’s assistance from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that can be helpful as well. For example, TRV (tax return verification) reports provide a streamlined method of verifying a borrower’s tax information by electronically comparing the income-related lines of the borrower’s tax return with the same lines on file at the IRS. This data can be obtained on any individual or business that has authorized the release of this information in connection with an application for credit. Any variations uncovered can be highlighted in an easily read report. TRVs offer further protection against fraud by verifying that the applicant’s information matches Social Security Administration files.

What you’ll need to do
Just like an air traffic controller needs to make the right decisions without panicking, so will you as a mortgage professional. It’s all about having a plan in place focused on prevention and reaction to incidents.

A big step is putting your program in writing, and in as much detail as possible. Not only must you say how you will work to prevent identity theft and mitigate it if it happens, you must be able to explain how you will update and execute on this plan for the future. You’ll need to think through how employees will be trained, and how this will be verified and continually improved upon.  Importantly, there needs to be buy-in from senior leaders within your company, since they are ultimately charged with overseeing the program.

Like a successful air traffic controller, a mortgage professional needs to rely on the right technology and expertise to keep everything moving smoothly. Taking a few important steps where identity theft protection and compliance with the Red Flags rules are concerned will keep your business under firm control.

 

If you are concerned about how the red flag rules may affect you and your business, please give Brandon King a call at 1-866-510-7907.

White House Is Drafting Executive Order to Allow Indefinite Detention; Move Would Bypass Congress

Posted in Attack on Freedom, International Bankers, New World Order, News, Police State/Martial Law, Stupid Government Tricks, Tyranny, Unconstitutional with tags , , , , , , , on June 29, 2009 by truthwillrise
by Dafna Linzer, ProPublica, and Peter Finn, Washington Post – June 26, 2009 4:25 pm EDT

 

The Obama administration, fearing a battle with Congress that could stall plans to close Guantanamo, is drafting an executive order that would reassert presidential authority to incarcerate suspected terrorists indefinitely, according to three senior government officials with knowledge of White House deliberations.

Such an order would embrace claims by former President George W. Bush that certain people can be detained without trial for long periods under the laws of war. Obama advisers are concerned that bypassing Congress could place the president on weaker footing before the courts and anger key supporters, the officials said.

After months of internal debate over how to close the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, White House officials are growing increasingly worried that reaching quick agreement with Congress on a new detention system may prove impossible. Several officials said there is concern in the White House that the administration may not be able to close the facility by the president’s January 2010 deadline.

White House spokesman Ben LaBolt did not directly respond to questions about an executive order but said the administration would address the cases of Guantanamo detainees in a manner “consistent with the national security interests of the United States and the interests of justice.”

One administration official suggested the White House was already trying to build support for an executive order.

“Civil liberties groups have encouraged the administration, that if a prolonged detention system were to be sought, to do it through executive order,” the official said. Such an order can be rescinded and would not block later efforts to write legislation, but civil liberties groups generally oppose long-term detention, arguing that detainees should either be prosecuted or released.

The Justice Department has declined comment on the prospects for a long-term detention system while internal reviews of Guantanamo detainees are underway. The reviews are expected to be completed by July 21.

In a May speech [1], President Obama broached the need for a system of long-term detention and suggested that it would include congressional and judicial oversight. “We must recognize that these detention policies cannot be unbounded. They can’t be based simply on what I or the Executive Branch decide alone,” the president said.

Some of Obama’s top legal advisers, along with a handful of influential Republican and Democratic lawmakers, have pushed for the creation of a “national security court” to supervise the incarceration of detainees deemed too dangerous to release but who cannot be charged or tried.

But the three senior government officials said the White House has turned away from that option, at least for now, because legislation establishing a special court would be both difficult to pass and likely to fracture Obama’s own party. These officials, as well as others interviewed for this story, spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about internal deliberations.

 

In this pool photo, reviewed by the U.S. military, and shot through glass, a guard watches over Guantanamo detainees inside the exercise yard at Camp 5 detention facility at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba, on May 31, 2009. (Brennan Linsley/AFP/Getty Images)
In this pool photo, reviewed by the U.S. military, and shot through glass, a guard watches over Guantanamo detainees inside the exercise yard at Camp 5 detention facility at Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba, on May 31, 2009. (Brennan Linsley/AFP/Getty Images)

On the day Obama took office, 242 men were imprisoned at Guantanamo. In his May speech, the president outlined five strategies the administration would use to deal with them: criminal trials, revamped military tribunals, transfers to other countries, releases and continued detention. (Read our sidebar: “Review of Gitmo Detainees Has Been Slow and Complex [2].”)

 

Since the inauguration, 11 detainees have been released or transferred, one prisoner committed suicide and one was moved to New York to face terrorism charges in federal court.

Administration officials said the cases of about half of the remaining 229 detainees have been reviewed for prosecution or release. Two officials involved in a Justice Department review of possible prosecutions said the administration is strongly considering criminal charges in federal court for Khaled Sheik Mohammed and three other detainees accused of involvement in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the United States.

The other half, the officials said, present the greatest difficulty because these detainees cannot be prosecuted either in federal court or military commissions. In many cases, the evidence against them is classified, has been provided by foreign intelligence services, or has been tainted by the Bush administration’s use of harsh interrogation techniques.

Attorney General Eric Holder agreed with an assessment offered during congressional testimony this month that fewer than 25 percent of the detainees would be charged in criminal courts and that 50 others have been approved for transfer or release. One official said the administration is still hoping that as many as 70 Yemeni citizens will be moved, in stages, into a rehabilitation program in Saudi Arabia.

Three months into the Justice Department’s reviews, several officials involved said they have found themselves agreeing with conclusions reached years earlier by the Bush administration: As many as 90 detainees can not be charged or released.

The White House has spent months meeting with key congressional leaders in the hopes of reaching agreement on long-term detention, even as public support for such a plan has wavered as lawmakers have sought to prevent detainees from being transferred to their home states.

Lawyers for the administration are now in negotiations with Sens. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., over separate legislation that would revamp military commissions. A senior Republican staff member said that senators have yet to see “a comprehensive, detailed policy” on long-term detention from the administration.

“They can do it without congressional backing, but I think there would be very strong concerns,” the staff member said, adding that “Congress could cut off funding” for any detention system established in the United States.

Concerns are growing among Obama’s advisers that Congress may try to assert too much control over the process. Earlier this week, Obama signed an appropriations bill that forces the administration to report to Congress before moving any detainee out of Guantanamo and prevents the White House from using available funds to move detainees onto U.S. soil.

“Legislation could kill Obama’s plans,” said one government official involved. The official said an executive order could be the best option for the president at this juncture.

Under one White House draft that was being discussed earlier this month, according to administration officials, detainees would be imprisoned at a military facility on U.S. soil, but their ongoing detention would be subject to annual presidential review. U.S. citizens would not be held in the system. (Last month, ProPublica explored the key issues around preventive detention [3].)

Such detainees — those at Guantanamo and those who may be captured in the future — would also have the right to legal representation during confinement and access to some of the information that is being used to keep them behind bars. Anyone detained under this order would have a right to challenge his detention before a judge.

Officials argue that the plan would give detainees more rights and allow them a better chance to one day end their indefinite incarceration than they have now at Guantanamo.

But some senior Democrats see long-term detention as tantamount to reestablishing the Guantanamo system on U.S. soil. “I think this could be a very big mistake, because of how such a system could be perceived throughout the world,” Sen. Russ Feingold, D-Wis., told Holder.

One administration official said future transfers to the United States for long-term detention would be rare. Al-Qaida operatives captured on the battlefield, which the official defined as Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and possibly the Horn of Africa, would be held in battlefield facilities. Suspects captured elsewhere in the world could be transferred to the United States for federal prosecution, turned over to local authorities, or returned to their home country.

“Going forward, unless it’s an extraordinary case, you will not see new transfers to the U.S. for indefinite detention,” the official said.

Instituting long-term detention through an executive order would leave Obama vulnerable to charges that he is willing to forsake the legislative branch of government, as his predecessor often did. Bush’s detention policies suffered successive defeats in the courts in part because they lacked congressional approval and tried to exclude judicial oversight.

“There is no statute prohibiting the president from doing this through executive order and so far courts have not ruled in ways that would bar him from doing so,” said Matthew Waxman, who worked on detainee issues at the Defense Department during Bush’s first term. But Waxman, who waged an internal battle inside the Bush administration for more congressional cooperation, said the “courts are more likely to defer to the president and legislative branch when they speak with one voice on these issues.”

 

Walid bin Attash (AP Images/Getty Images)
Walid bin Attash (AP Images/Getty Images)

Walid bin Attash, who is accused [4] of involvement in the bombing of the USS Cole in 2000 and who was held at a secret CIA prison, could be among those subject to long-term detention, according to one senior official.

 

Little information on bin Attash’s case has been made public, but officials who have reviewed his file said the Justice Department has concluded that none of the three witnesses against him can be brought to testify in court. One witness, who was jailed in Yemen, escaped several years ago. A second witness remains incarcerated, but the government of Yemen will not allow him to testify.

Administration officials believe that testimony from the only witness in U.S. custody, Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, may be inadmissible because he was subjected to harsh interrogation while in CIA custody.

“These issues haven’t morphed simply because the administration changed,” said Juan Zarate, who served as Bush’s deputy national security adviser for counterterrorism and is now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.

“The challenge for the new administration is how to solve these legal question of preventive detention in a way that is consistent with the Constitution, legitimate in the eyes of the world and doesn’t create security loopholes that causes Congress to worry,” Zarate said.

Washington Post staff researcher Julie Tate contributed to this report.